t h e t e c t o n
University of Arizona Architecture. Los Angeles, CA native.
t h e t e c t o n
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Driss Ouadahi - Fences (2010-12)
Driss Ouadahi - Fences (2010-12)
Driss Ouadahi - Fences (2010-12)
Driss Ouadahi - Fences (2010-12)
Driss Ouadahi - Fences (2010-12)
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Spring, sprunging
Spring, sprunging
Spring, sprunging
Spring, sprunging
Spring, sprunging
Spring, sprunging
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futureproofdesigns:

House T Interior
Hiroyuki Shinozaki Architects, photography by Hiroyasu Sakaguchi
2012
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Complex works of the Venezuelan artist Rafael Araujo
http://www.rafael-araujo.com/calculo_ing.html
Complex works of the Venezuelan artist Rafael Araujo
http://www.rafael-araujo.com/calculo_ing.html
Complex works of the Venezuelan artist Rafael Araujo
http://www.rafael-araujo.com/calculo_ing.html
Complex works of the Venezuelan artist Rafael Araujo
http://www.rafael-araujo.com/calculo_ing.html
Complex works of the Venezuelan artist Rafael Araujo
http://www.rafael-araujo.com/calculo_ing.html
Complex works of the Venezuelan artist Rafael Araujo
http://www.rafael-araujo.com/calculo_ing.html
Complex works of the Venezuelan artist Rafael Araujo
http://www.rafael-araujo.com/calculo_ing.html
Complex works of the Venezuelan artist Rafael Araujo
http://www.rafael-araujo.com/calculo_ing.html
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Lindsay Hamlyn.
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staceythinx:

Triple Helix is a kinetic sculpture by Reuben Margolin. 
Margolin on his project:

For years now, whenever my mind was free to drift, I’ve invariably found myself trying to imagine the confluence of three waves. I had a feeling the forms created would be beautiful, and somehow true to this world. But the design proved wonderfully elusive, and the mental pursuit took me down all sorts of paths…
The Triple Helix has 1027 hexagonal wood blocks, a welded steel frame, three aluminum helices and a polycarbonate matrix with 9280 pulleys. The sheer number of parts combined with a high level of precision almost got the better of me, but served to dramatically increase both the fluidity and variability. The combined amplitude is greater than the diameter, resulting in a continuous wavescape of steep contours and smooth curves. The forms are mathematically complex, full of unexpected saddles and peaks. At the same time its sensuousness reminds me of traditional figure drawing: I keep wanting to get a pad of paper and spend time studying each pose it takes.

You can see it in motion in this video:
staceythinx:

Triple Helix is a kinetic sculpture by Reuben Margolin. 
Margolin on his project:

For years now, whenever my mind was free to drift, I’ve invariably found myself trying to imagine the confluence of three waves. I had a feeling the forms created would be beautiful, and somehow true to this world. But the design proved wonderfully elusive, and the mental pursuit took me down all sorts of paths…
The Triple Helix has 1027 hexagonal wood blocks, a welded steel frame, three aluminum helices and a polycarbonate matrix with 9280 pulleys. The sheer number of parts combined with a high level of precision almost got the better of me, but served to dramatically increase both the fluidity and variability. The combined amplitude is greater than the diameter, resulting in a continuous wavescape of steep contours and smooth curves. The forms are mathematically complex, full of unexpected saddles and peaks. At the same time its sensuousness reminds me of traditional figure drawing: I keep wanting to get a pad of paper and spend time studying each pose it takes.

You can see it in motion in this video:
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David Eskenazi
Drawn Mass
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Under Wraps: Buildings in Transition
by Loren Nelson | Via
Under Wraps: Buildings in Transition
by Loren Nelson | Via
Under Wraps: Buildings in Transition
by Loren Nelson | Via
Under Wraps: Buildings in Transition
by Loren Nelson | Via
Under Wraps: Buildings in Transition
by Loren Nelson | Via
Under Wraps: Buildings in Transition
by Loren Nelson | Via
Under Wraps: Buildings in Transition
by Loren Nelson | Via
Under Wraps: Buildings in Transition
by Loren Nelson | Via
Under Wraps: Buildings in Transition
by Loren Nelson | Via
Under Wraps: Buildings in Transition
by Loren Nelson | Via
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Friends
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The Machines Have Become Integral … | Katie Shima | The Draftery
Following her own constraints to their eventual ends, Shima’s drawings demonstrate the logically nonsensical character inherent to any set of drawings. Her traditional drafting techniques take full advantage of drawing’s status as an art object, meanwhile her subject matter taps into our modernist anxieties. It is unclear if these naturalized formations of mechanical pieces have been constructed or heaped; even what appear to be partial views of Fritz Kahn-like bodies provide no grounding figure or context to pull us outside of Shima’s playful ambiguity. The horizon fades to white before we find our way inside.
The Machines Have Become Integral … | Katie Shima | The Draftery
Following her own constraints to their eventual ends, Shima’s drawings demonstrate the logically nonsensical character inherent to any set of drawings. Her traditional drafting techniques take full advantage of drawing’s status as an art object, meanwhile her subject matter taps into our modernist anxieties. It is unclear if these naturalized formations of mechanical pieces have been constructed or heaped; even what appear to be partial views of Fritz Kahn-like bodies provide no grounding figure or context to pull us outside of Shima’s playful ambiguity. The horizon fades to white before we find our way inside.
The Machines Have Become Integral … | Katie Shima | The Draftery
Following her own constraints to their eventual ends, Shima’s drawings demonstrate the logically nonsensical character inherent to any set of drawings. Her traditional drafting techniques take full advantage of drawing’s status as an art object, meanwhile her subject matter taps into our modernist anxieties. It is unclear if these naturalized formations of mechanical pieces have been constructed or heaped; even what appear to be partial views of Fritz Kahn-like bodies provide no grounding figure or context to pull us outside of Shima’s playful ambiguity. The horizon fades to white before we find our way inside.
The Machines Have Become Integral … | Katie Shima | The Draftery
Following her own constraints to their eventual ends, Shima’s drawings demonstrate the logically nonsensical character inherent to any set of drawings. Her traditional drafting techniques take full advantage of drawing’s status as an art object, meanwhile her subject matter taps into our modernist anxieties. It is unclear if these naturalized formations of mechanical pieces have been constructed or heaped; even what appear to be partial views of Fritz Kahn-like bodies provide no grounding figure or context to pull us outside of Shima’s playful ambiguity. The horizon fades to white before we find our way inside.
The Machines Have Become Integral … | Katie Shima | The Draftery
Following her own constraints to their eventual ends, Shima’s drawings demonstrate the logically nonsensical character inherent to any set of drawings. Her traditional drafting techniques take full advantage of drawing’s status as an art object, meanwhile her subject matter taps into our modernist anxieties. It is unclear if these naturalized formations of mechanical pieces have been constructed or heaped; even what appear to be partial views of Fritz Kahn-like bodies provide no grounding figure or context to pull us outside of Shima’s playful ambiguity. The horizon fades to white before we find our way inside.
The Machines Have Become Integral … | Katie Shima | The Draftery
Following her own constraints to their eventual ends, Shima’s drawings demonstrate the logically nonsensical character inherent to any set of drawings. Her traditional drafting techniques take full advantage of drawing’s status as an art object, meanwhile her subject matter taps into our modernist anxieties. It is unclear if these naturalized formations of mechanical pieces have been constructed or heaped; even what appear to be partial views of Fritz Kahn-like bodies provide no grounding figure or context to pull us outside of Shima’s playful ambiguity. The horizon fades to white before we find our way inside.
The Machines Have Become Integral … | Katie Shima | The Draftery
Following her own constraints to their eventual ends, Shima’s drawings demonstrate the logically nonsensical character inherent to any set of drawings. Her traditional drafting techniques take full advantage of drawing’s status as an art object, meanwhile her subject matter taps into our modernist anxieties. It is unclear if these naturalized formations of mechanical pieces have been constructed or heaped; even what appear to be partial views of Fritz Kahn-like bodies provide no grounding figure or context to pull us outside of Shima’s playful ambiguity. The horizon fades to white before we find our way inside.
The Machines Have Become Integral … | Katie Shima | The Draftery
Following her own constraints to their eventual ends, Shima’s drawings demonstrate the logically nonsensical character inherent to any set of drawings. Her traditional drafting techniques take full advantage of drawing’s status as an art object, meanwhile her subject matter taps into our modernist anxieties. It is unclear if these naturalized formations of mechanical pieces have been constructed or heaped; even what appear to be partial views of Fritz Kahn-like bodies provide no grounding figure or context to pull us outside of Shima’s playful ambiguity. The horizon fades to white before we find our way inside.
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Werner Tscholl - Sigmundskron castle renovation, Bolzano 2003. Photos (C) Alexa Rainer.
Werner Tscholl - Sigmundskron castle renovation, Bolzano 2003. Photos (C) Alexa Rainer.
Werner Tscholl - Sigmundskron castle renovation, Bolzano 2003. Photos (C) Alexa Rainer.
Werner Tscholl - Sigmundskron castle renovation, Bolzano 2003. Photos (C) Alexa Rainer.
Werner Tscholl - Sigmundskron castle renovation, Bolzano 2003. Photos (C) Alexa Rainer.
Werner Tscholl - Sigmundskron castle renovation, Bolzano 2003. Photos (C) Alexa Rainer.